Working in Ireland with a student visa

working in Ireland

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Studying and working in Ireland is one of the best options for both Europeans and non-members of the European Union who want to improve their English, work and want to settle in this country. In the following interview we’ll tell you the story of a Mexican girl who traveled to Dublin to study English and to work thanks to a student visa.

Studying and working in Ireland

  • Basic infotmation: Hello, my name is Jimena, I’m 30 years old and I’m from Mexico. I currently live in Ireland and I’m enjoying the Irish student experience.
  • Why did you choose Ireland?: It was a random selection, I was looking for countries where I could practice and improve my level of English.
  • How long have you lived in Dublin?: Since January 2015.

Alternatives to Ireland to learn English

  • What other options did you look at before choosing Dublin?: The UK was among my options, but the visa doesn’t allow you to study and work at the same time. Then I looked at Australia and New Zealand, but I had to discard them because they were out of my budget, so when my supervisor suggested Ireland to me it was like an enlightenment.

Procedures to be able to study and work in Ireland:

  • What were the procedures you had to follow to be able to live there? Did you need a visa? I arrived with my passport, the English course already paid for, my health insurance and the amount of money requested in the bank account. Then I went to the migration office to start my student visa process. This visa is called Stamp 2, which allows you to work 40 hours in the high season (summer and Christmas) and 20 hours during the other months.

What is Irish English like?

  • How was your adaptation to the language? Did you have good knowledge of English before arriving there? I remember that before I arrived in Ireland I felt ready to communicate in English, but I needed time to adapt and I almost “panicked” when I heard how strong the Irish accent was.
  • How did you learn English? I learned English through OHC school courses and my ability to survive since I had no other options.

What is it like to live in Ireland?

Ireland is a country that never ceases to amaze me: I like its landscapes, its habit of drinking tea at all times and the delicious taste of butter and milk. But I still haven’t gotten used to its simple and “poor” meals. (since I come from a country rich in gastronomy)

What is the quality of life like in Ireland?

The quality of life is very good in this country, but it is somewhat expensive. For example the price of renting a room, depending on the location and the type (single or shared), can be from 400 to 1000 euros per room. Renting an apartment instead is expensive and there’s a lot of demand. If you’re looking for a room or a flat in Ireland (or if you just want to get an idea) you can check it out here.

What is it like to study and work in Ireland?

As for the job search, face to face is more effective where you deliver the CV directly to the manager, this system has always worked for me. I’ve been pretty lucky because I found a job in two weeks.

There are also useful online pages to look for a job in Ireland as:

The minimum wage in 2020 is 10.10 euros per hour for “adult workers” (over-19 years old) and the working day depends on what is established in the contract (in high season in hospitality work is usually 40 hours).

Do you recommend studying and working in Ireland?

I recommend this country to live because I have felt welcome since I arrived and Irish people have usually been very friendly to me.

And for those who are planning to move to Ireland, I recommend being prepared for the cold, encourage yourself to take this turn in your life, and come with a positive attitude to accept the new changes. I also advise you to be a flexible person to be able to accept the challenges that this adventure takes.

If you want to know more about working and studying at the same time in Germany, check this post.

Interview conducted in November 2020 with @jimenamromo

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